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John Norris Elevated to American Society of Landscape Architects’ Council of Fellows 

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John Norris, FASLA of Norris Design, a pioneer who recognized the critical need to address water conservation and native landscape protection well before they became best practices, is one of 35 members inducted into the Council of Fellows of the American Society of Landscape Architects. 

 The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) selects members to be elevated as ASLA Fellows for their exceptional contributions to the landscape architecture profession and society at large. Election to the ASLA Council of Fellows is among the highest honors the ASLA bestows on members and is based on their works, leadership/management, knowledge, and service. Norris was recognized at the investiture ceremony that took place on Nov. 21 at the National ASLA conference in Nashville. He was accompanied by his escort, Chip Crawford, FASLA, family members, and many Norris Design colleagues. 

Nominated in the Leadership/Management category by the ASLA Colorado Chapter, Norris was recognized for his 36-year career in landscape architecture and the award-winning firm he established in 1985. ASLA also recognized his ongoing involvement with his alma mater, Kansas State University, including fourteen years on the Dean’s Advisory Council, and his impact on the education of generations of landscape architects. His leadership of the ACE Mentor Program of Colorado has introduced more than 1,000 high school students to the design and construction professions. 

Norris not only influenced landscape architecture in the West by pioneering and implementing strategies that aligned with the region’s climate, but he also recognized the critical need to address water conservation and native landscape protection. He was also recognized for changing the perception of what a landscape architect can accomplish through his firm’s body of work. 

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